Central Air Conditioners

We place a high demand on our air conditioners with the GTA’s hot summers. In the summer months, we can spend well over a thousand dollars in electricity to run our air conditioners. Additionally, they seem to need repair on the hottest day of the summer! With our unbeatable warranties, you won’t care if they break because you are completely covered! When the manufacturer guarantees its equipment unconditionally, you know you have a unit you can depend on. Installing a new, high-efficiency air conditioner automatically qualifies you for a $400 cash rebate from OPA as well as hundreds of dollars in electricity savings. These top-of-the-line units run quietly, reliably, and efficiently.

In a split-system central air conditioner, an outdoor metal cabinet contains the condenser and compressor, and an indoor cabinet contains the evaporator. This evaporator coil installed on top of the furnace is completely hidden by the ductwork. The coil is then cooled by refrigerant from the condensing unit and the furnaces fan blower sends the home’s air through the coil which exits the vents. Central air conditioners and forced air furnaces work together to provide you with cool air. If your home already has a furnace but no air conditioner, a split-system is the most economical central air conditioner to install.

Central air conditioners are more efficient than room air conditioners. In addition, they are out of the way, quiet, and convenient to operate. To save energy and money, you should try to buy an energy-efficient air conditioner and reduce your central air conditioner’s energy use. In an average air-conditioned home, air conditioning consumes more than 2,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year, causing power plants to emit about 3,500 pounds of carbon dioxide and 31 pounds of sulfur dioxide.

If you are considering adding central air conditioning to our home, the deciding factor may be the need for ductwork. If you decide that you don’t want to install ducts in your home, then a ductless air conditioner will be the best option for you.

When considering to upgrade your existing a/c, be sure to install a high-efficiency unit with an Energy Star certification. This will qualify you for a $400 cash rebate and substantial savings on your electricity bills. Any unit that is 16 SEER or higher will provide you with the rebate.

Today’s best air conditioners use 30% to 50% less energy to produce the same amount of cooling as air conditioners made in the mid-1970s. Even if your air conditioner is only 10 years old, you may save 20% to 40% of your cooling energy costs by replacing it with a newer, more efficient model.

Proper sizing and installation are key elements in determining air conditioner efficiency. Too large a unit will not adequately remove humidity. Too small a unit will not be able to attain a comfortable temperature on the hottest days. Improper unit location, lack of insulation, and improper duct installation can greatly diminish efficiency.

If your air conditioner is installed correctly, or if major installation problems are found and fixed, it will perform efficiently for years with only minor routine maintenance. However, many air conditioners are not installed correctly. As an unfortunate result, modern energy-efficient air conditioners can perform almost as poorly as older inefficient models.

When installing a new central air conditioning system, be sure that your contractor:

  • Allows adequate indoor space for the installation, maintenance, and repair of the new system, and installs an access door in the furnace or duct to provide a way to clean the evaporator coil
  • Uses a duct-sizing methodology
  • Ensures there are enough supply registers to deliver cool air and enough return air registers to carry warm house air back to the air conditioner
  • Installs ductwork within the conditioned space, not in the attic, wherever possible
  • Seals all ducts with duct mastic and heavily insulates attic ducts
  • Locates the condensing unit where its noise will not keep you or your neighbors awake at night, if possible
  • Locates the condensing unit where no nearby objects will block airflow to it
  • Verifies that the newly installed air conditioner has the exact refrigerant charge and airflow rate specified by the manufacturer
  • Locates the thermostat away from heat sources, such as windows or supply registers.

If you are replacing an older or failed split system, be sure that the evaporator coil is replaced with a new one that exactly matches the condenser coil in the new condensing unit. (The air conditioner’s efficiency will likely not improve if the existing evaporator coil is left in place; in fact, the old coil could cause the new compressor to fail prematurely.)

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